Kasama space cooks up creativity in Seattle’s Sodo neighborhood

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Kasama, a sodo room with a fully equipped kitchen that serves as a meeting point and studio for BIPOC creatives and culinary professionals.

When Kristina Capulong struggled to find her place in video production, she rarely saw other people who looked like her. “You can’t be what you can’t see,” she says, so she’s worked hard to find other non-white creatives, other women in her industry.

Now the graduate and associate producer of the Philippine culinary school Kasama has opened a room in the Sodo neighborhood of Seattle, with a fully equipped kitchen that serves as a meeting place and studio for creative and culinary BIPOC professionals to prevent this challenge from being presented to others.

The name Kasama means “to be involved,” explains Capulong, and her vision is a space that their Kasama – their ally – can be and play that role for other people in the industry. She sees food as a medium to collect oneself and tell stories, and Kasama builds on this principle. “It has to do with having physical space as a manifestation of hope.”

Kasama, a sodo room with a fully equipped kitchen that serves as a meeting point and studio for BIPOC creatives and culinary professionals.

Courtesy Kristina Capulong / Kasama

In Kasama, large windows, high ceilings, and long white walls offer plenty of natural light and a neutral background for food videos like those used by Melissa Miranda from Musang for her Little Wildcats children’s cooking videos. Miranda is part of the Capulong team with photographers Karen Kirsch and Andrew Imanaka and shares the space with the company. The group hopes to use Kasama to expand the Seattle food scene, giving chefs and restaurants, as well as food photographers and videographers space for creation and education. “We want this to be a place of connection,” says Capulong, “where we can do things together.”

Although she has rarely worked on sets with other BIPOCs, Capulong knows there are others out there who work at a high level in the field, and she hopes Kasama can help connect them and make them more visible. “I want people to see that. I want them to be inspired. “

Kasama, a sodo room with a fully equipped kitchen that serves as a meeting point and studio for BIPOC creatives and culinary professionals.

Kasama, a sodo room with a fully equipped kitchen that serves as a meeting point and studio for BIPOC creatives and culinary professionals.

Courtesy Kristina Capulong / Kasama

Kasama opened its doors last week and Capulong is encouraging people to visit the space, share their personal projects and meet the team. “Accessibility is our main concern,” she says. One of their jobs is to build the business so that they can support their community members. “We want everyone to feel welcome.”