Live: Coronavirus daily news updates, February 17: What to know today about COVID-19 in the Seattle area, Washington state and the world

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Live: Coronavirus daily news updates, February 17: What to know today about COVID-19 in the Seattle area, Washington state and the world

With much of the US recovering from a winter storm over the weekend, health officials are concerned about the impact of the weather on the coronavirus vaccination campaign.

In Washington, Governor Jay Inslee announced Tuesday that the state would expand COVID-19 testing resources to nearly 50 school districts – part of an effort to get more K-12 students back into personal learning.

We update this page with the latest news about the COVID-19 pandemic and its impact on the Seattle area, the US and the world. Click here for live updates from the past few days and all other coronavirus information. Here’s how we are tracking the daily spread in Washington and the world.

Authorities: Men posing as US marshals to avoid wearing masks

Two men are accused of posing as federal marshals and issuing false IDs to stop wearing face covers at a resort hotel in South Florida.

When Wyndham Deerfield Beach Resort employees asked Walter Wayne Brown Jr., 53, and Gary Brummett, 81, to cover their faces, the men refused, threatening to arrest employees and fined the hotel, the South Florida SunSentinel reported to saddle.

The system collapsed when an employee believed he was suspicious and called the police on February 11th. Officials and a full-time US Marshal came and arrested the men on charges of posing as federal officials.

Read the story here.

-The Associated Press

6:49 am

In the town hall, Biden advertises plans and offers reassurance

President Joe Biden speaks to viewers as he waits for a commercial break to end during a televised town hall event at the Pabst Theater in Milwaukee on Tuesday, February 16, 2021.  (AP Photo / Evan Vucci)

President Joe Biden speaks to viewers as he waits for a commercial break to end during a televised town hall event at the Pabst Theater in Milwaukee on Tuesday, February 16, 2021. (AP Photo / Evan Vucci)

On his first official trip from Washington since taking office, President Joe Biden reassured Americans Tuesday of the availability of coronavirus vaccines and optimism that his $ 1.9 trillion relief bill was an ambitious plan to restore the U.S. economy could.

“Now is the time we should be,” he said at a CNN town hall in Milwaukee that included not only his own supporters, but Trump voters and independents. “Now is the time to grow up.”

Regarding the coronavirus, he said that any American who wanted a vaccine could get one “by the end of July this year.” The US would have over 600 million doses, enough to vaccinate every single American.

The town hall’s question-and-answer format gave the president an opportunity to practice what has been his trademark personal politics for decades. When an independent voter asked him how her son with a pre-existing illness could get the vaccine, for example, Biden said to her, “If you want, I’ll stay here after this is over and maybe we can talk for a few minutes and.” Let’s see if I can help you. “

Read the story here.

– Annie Karni, New York Times

6:13 am

Find out about the last 24 hours

• • Frustrated with Finding a COVID-19 Vaccine? So did columnist Danny Westneat, who writes about four guerrilla technicians in the Seattle area inventing the state’s first one-stop-shot finder instead of getting angry. And here’s our update guide on who’s currently eligible.

• • Washington state adds at least 48 school districts on its COVID-19 testing program, including several in West Washington, to get more students back into buildings.

• • Double masking can increase your protection, but not all masks should be layered. Here is a detailed overview of the most effective masking strategies.

• • Getting the first vaccine is like “starting a cold car”. But after that, people’s bodies spin differently, infectious disease experts explain, while pointing out possible side effects that they need to prepare for.

• • Seattle City Council promises to distribute the vaccines fairly by lifting multiple barriers.

• • The US must “stop snooping around” A dozen scientists told the Biden government to take immediate action to stop airborne transmission of the virus in workplaces.

– Kris Higginson

00:01 am

How is the pandemic affecting you?

What has changed in your daily life? What kind of conversations do you have with family members and friends? Are you a health worker who is at the forefront of the answer? Are you or do you know a COVID-19 patient? Whoever you are, we want to hear from you so that our reporting is as complete, accurate and useful as possible. If you’re using a mobile device and can’t see the form on this page, click here.

Seattle Times staff and news services