Live: Coronavirus daily news updates, February 23: What to know today about COVID-19 in the Seattle area, Washington state and the world

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Live: Coronavirus daily news updates, February 23: What to know today about COVID-19 in the Seattle area, Washington state and the world

As the United States passed 500,000 coronavirus deaths on Monday, President Joe Biden tried to strike a balance between grief and hope. The number is almost equal to the number of Americans killed in World War II, Korea, and Vietnam combined.

Meanwhile, some Washington state vendors are said to be receiving twice as much vaccine this week – a “double shipment” – after ice and snow delayed shipments across the country for the past week.

We update this page with the latest news about the COVID-19 pandemic and its impact on the Seattle area, the US and the world. Click here to see the live updates from the past few days and all other coronavirus reports. Here’s how we’re tracking the daily spread in Washington and the world.

The World Bank could stop funding vaccines for Lebanon

The World Bank on Tuesday threatened to suspend funding for coronavirus vaccines in Lebanon over alleged violations by MPs who were vaccinated without prior registration.

A man waits his turn to receive the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine during a nationwide vaccination campaign at Saint George Hospital in Beirut, Lebanon on Tuesday, February 16, 2021.  Lebanon started its vaccination campaign after receiving the first batch of the vaccine - 28,500 doses from Brussels, with more expected to arrive in the coming weeks.  (AP Photo / Hussein Malla)

A man waits his turn to receive the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine during a nationwide vaccination campaign at Saint George Hospital in Beirut, Lebanon on Tuesday, February 16, 2021. Lebanon started its vaccination campaign after receiving the first batch of the vaccine – 28,500 doses from Brussels, with more expected to arrive in the coming weeks. (AP Photo / Hussein Malla)

Such a step by the World Bank would have serious consequences, as Lebanon is grappling with severe financial and economic crises and urgently needs help. The World Bank announced last month that it had approved $ 34 million to pay for vaccines for Lebanon to vaccinate over 2 million people.

The vaccination campaign began on February 14th and Lebanon has received nearly 60,000 doses of Pfizer BioNTech vaccine to date.

Sharaf Abu Sharaf, president of the Lebanese Order of Doctors, said the violations included vaccinating people who were not registered or who were not included in the first phase of the campaign.

Lebanon is known for the corruption and nepotism that have brought the Mediterranean nation to the brink of bankruptcy.

Read the story here.

-The Associated Press

8:11 am

Farewell to Bras, “Hard Pants”, and Business Casual: How COVID-19 Changed Our Clothing and How We Feel About Clothing

(Gabriel Campanario / The Seattle Times)

(Gabriel Campanario / The Seattle Times)

We want to be comfortable, but also look good when zoomed in. We didn’t know how uncomfortable jeans were until we stopped wearing them. If you’ve worn one in the office, you may still be able to wear your work badge at home. Some of us are indescribably chic. Black masks go with everything. And we really hate bras.

According to the climate and office culture, our clothing has changed significantly over the course of the year we survived the coronavirus pandemic. Between mask mandates, the advent of remote work, the fall of going out and assignments to stay at home, we dress more idiosyncratically now than perhaps ever before. Our social worlds have narrowed, as has our fashion choices. After all, if your job is removed overnight, the external fashion rules also apply – and in Seattle we didn’t have that many at first.

The result? Those of us who have the privilege of being able to work from home during the pandemic have also been given the option to wear whatever we want. Our clothes (and the categories we put them into) have gotten softer and more inventive, from being full of sports 24/7 to evening wear in the supermarket. Often, formality is a waist enterprise or a deliberate decision that gives momentary brightness to a world that feels more and more like a common piece of endurance with each passing day.

Read the story here.

– Megan Burbank

8:02 a.m.

Drug execs face questions about Capitol Hill about vaccine supplies

Executives at major COVID-19 vaccine manufacturers on Tuesday will answer questions from Congress about expanding the range of shots needed to contain the pandemic that killed more than 500,000 Americans.

The hearing comes as U.S. vaccinations continue to accelerate after a sluggish start and recent disruption from winter weather. However, according to state health officials, the demand for vaccinations far exceeds the federal government’s limited weekly supplies.

The Energy and Trade Committee panel will hear from the five companies that have signed contracts to supply COVID-19 footage to the United States: Pfizer, Moderna, Johnson & Johnson, AstraZeneca and Novavax.

“We want to know what these companies are doing to get production going and what else can be done to get these vaccines out earlier to those who need them,” said MP Diana DeGette in a statement announcing the hearing has been. The Colorado Democrat chairs the subcommittee of inquiry that oversees US health care.

Read the story here.

-The Associated Press

7:51 am

Alaska nonprofit group to donate Juneau vaccine doses

A nonprofit health organization plans to donate some of the COVID-19 vaccines it receives from the Indian Federal Health Service to the city and borough of Juneau.

Juneau City Emergency Manager Robert Barr said the vaccine donation from the Southeast Alaska Regional Health Consortium will be used during the county’s next mass vaccination clinic on March 12-13, KTOO Public Media reported.

The consortium and the city are working together to vaccinate a larger portion of the Juneau area’s eligible population, Barr said.

Read the story here.

-The Associated Press

6:14 am

Find out about the last 24 hours

  • Some Washington state vaccine suppliers receive duplicate shipments After last week’s stormy weather, doses were delayed in the US. Here’s what to expect and how to find a vaccine.
  • Seattle is slowing down the reopening of school buildings. The district, still in negotiations with its teachers’ union, now says the youngest students will not return until March 8th. Even this date is not a guarantee.
  • Glimmers of hope came On the same day, the U.S. grimly marked half a million COVID-19 deaths. In the UK, cases were falling and there was strong evidence that vaccines work “spectacularly well”. But US leaders fear that Americans will decrease their vigilance. “Now is not the time to say, ‘We’re doing really well, let’s back off,'” warned Dr. Anthony Fauci.
  • In a virus-ravaged US city Where competition for vaccines is intense, nearly 400 million doses are made – and shipped elsewhere.
  • The loss of smell after COVID-19 is nothing to smell. Some people develop dysfunction long after other symptoms have gone away. Food is tasteless and depression is a risk: “Your life will be much poorer.”
  • People who wear glasses may be less likely getting the virus according to a new study.

– Kris Higginson

Seattle Times staff and news services