Live: Coronavirus daily news updates, February 6: What to know today about COVID-19 in the Seattle area, Washington state and the world

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Live: Coronavirus daily news updates, February 6: What to know today about COVID-19 in the Seattle area, Washington state and the world

With the pandemic continuing to hit the color communities hardest, the Biden government on Friday promised black business leaders to ensure that economic support programs can reach businesses owned by colored people. In Washington, new data shows that black and Hispanic residents received comparatively little vaccination.

We update this page with the latest news about the COVID-19 pandemic and its impact on the Seattle area, the US and the world. Click here to see the live updates from the past few days and all other coronavirus reports. Here’s how we are tracking the daily spread in Washington and the world.

Biden’s dilemma in the fight against virus aid: Go big or non-partisan

FILE - In this file photo dated February 5, 2021, President Joe Biden speaks about the economy in the state dining room of the White House in Washington.  (AP Photo / Alex Brandon, File)

FILE – In this file photo dated February 5, 2021, President Joe Biden speaks about the economy in the state dining room of the White House in Washington. (AP Photo / Alex Brandon, File)

President Joe Biden’s call for a $ 1.9 trillion COVID-19 bill forces an internal reckoning that drives his instinct to work towards a bipartisan deal against the demands of an urgent crisis and desire for those to deliver who have chosen him.

His bipartisan trust was a defining feature of his political career, first as a deal maker in the Senate, later as Vice President, and finally during his successful 2020 campaign as he led legislative negotiations for the Obama administration.

But the scale of the numerous crises the nation now faces, as well as the lessons Democrats learned from four years of Republican obstructionism during Barack Obama’s presidency, seem to urge Biden to take swift action on the coronavirus relief bill even if the Republicans are left behind.

Read the whole story here.

-The Associated Press

10:31 am

How do I get the COVID-19 vaccine in Washington State?

A driver is instructed to drive to a COVID-19 vaccination tent in the Puyallup Fairground parking lot on Jan. 28.  (Alan Berner / The Seattle Times)

A driver is instructed to drive to a COVID-19 vaccination tent in the Puyallup Fairground parking lot on Jan. 28. (Alan Berner / The Seattle Times)

Demand for the coronavirus vaccine has been immense since the cans were first shipped. After vaccinations in the first phase expanded to some non-health workers and others, and mass vaccination sites opened across the state, the appointment rush has become desperate.

Until the federal government’s vaccine supply increases, the widespread frustration of those trying to make appointments for themselves or their loved ones will continue.

To help you navigate the process, the Seattle Times provides an updated guide on how to get the COVID-19 vaccine. Our reporters have also answered common questions, including how people can schedule an appointment and what is considered a multi-generational household.

Do you have further questions for reporters from the Seattle Times? You can submit them here.

– Seattle Times employee

10:00 a.m

Less affluent countries don’t want to wait and look for their own vaccines

With coronavirus cases still on the rise, Honduras got tired of waiting for vaccinations through a United Nations program, so the small Central American country went independent and secured the shots through a private deal.

Other nations are also getting impatient. Unlike previous disease outbreaks, where less affluent countries have generally waited for vaccines to be delivered by the United Nations and other agencies, many are now taking matters into their own hands. Experts are increasingly concerned that these standalone efforts could undermine a United Nations-backed program to provide COVID-19 recordings to the world’s most vulnerable people.

Countries like Serbia, Bangladesh and Mexico have recently started vaccinating citizens through donations or trade deals – an approach that could leave even fewer vaccines for the program known as COVAX, as rich countries have already used up most of this year’s supply to have.

Read the whole story here.

-The Associated Press

9:25 am

What can you expect from Super Bowl Sunday in a pandemic?

The Marco Polo Bar & Grill in Georgetown makes its own buffalo sauce with a secret recipe - and it's served on the side so you can immerse yourself to your heart's content.  (Ellen M. Banner / The Seattle Times)

The Marco Polo Bar & Grill in Georgetown makes its own buffalo sauce with a secret recipe – and it’s served on the side so you can immerse yourself to your heart’s content. (Ellen M. Banner / The Seattle Times)

Like everything else in the pandemic, watching the Super Bowl will be different this year.

Health officials like Dr. Anthony Fauci have urged fans not to congregate. Being inside with people from outside your household is especially risky, and officials warn that guard parties could lead to outbreaks.

“I’m honestly worried about Super Bowl Sunday. People gather, they watch games together. We have seen football party outbreaks before, ”said Rochelle Walensky, director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). “So I really think we have to look at this and be careful.”

The CDC recommends fans throw a virtual watch party, enjoy the game with people in their household, or chat with family and friends in a group chat. When you congregate, it’s safer to be outside than inside, and people should sit at least three feet away from those they don’t live with.

Even if you only watch the game with your household, you can still enjoy great food. Consider supporting local restaurants by ordering take away. Here are some recommendations for spots in the Seattle area that have great, classic football fare to add to your spread.

If your favorite part of the Super Bowl is watching ads, you can expect to see ads this year that focus on comfort and escape. Here’s a preview.

And, if you’re a DirecTV subscriber, you need to know how to watch the game this year.

– Staff at the Seattle Times and The Associated Press

8:59 a.m.

Rainier Valley Community Unites to Launch COVID-19 Pop-Up Immunization Site

Gladys Stewart, 82, receives a coronavirus vaccination from a University of Seattle nursing student at a pop-up clinic for the Brighton Apartments and Southeast Seattle Senior Center in the Rainier Valley on Wednesday.  Stewart says she looked forward to the vaccine and appreciated that the doses were given near her home.

Gladys Stewart, 82, receives a coronavirus vaccination from a University of Seattle nursing student at a pop-up clinic for the Brighton Apartments and Southeast Seattle Senior Center in the Rainier Valley on Wednesday. Stewart says she looked forward to the vaccine and appreciated that the doses were given near her home. “So many people who don’t have a car,” she says. “I was so happy to hear you were coming.” (Erika Schultz / The Seattle Times)

Groups of seniors left their homes at the Brighton Apartments on Rainier Avenue South, went to a parking lot next door and were given something that was hard to come by this winter: a coveted COVID-19 vaccine.

Volunteers registered and greeted the elders and found them socially distant seats. A retired pharmacist was preparing cans for volunteer nurses. Brighton Apartment community leaders interpreted a variety of languages: Amharic, Tigrinya, Oromiffa, and Somali.

In total, around 100 seniors received their first of two doses of the Moderna vaccine on Wednesday through this pop-up clinic organized by Othello Station Pharmacy, Somali Health Board and Brighton Apartments to try to eradicate racial and technological differences has plagued the vaccine rollout.

When Othello Station Pharmacy received its first vaccine allocation from the State Department of Health (DOH) on Monday, owner Ahmed Ali worked quickly to focus on The Brighton residents aged 65 and over, most of whom are colored and many of whom are immigrants .

“This is being led by the community in collaboration with the Ministry of Health,” said Ali, who is also the executive director of the Somali Health Board. “COVID has had a significant impact on the color communities. We want to make it easier for them to access the vaccine. We also wanted to include people they could relate to – pharmacists, nurses, and community lawyers who look like them. “

Read the full story and see more photos here.

—Erika Schultz

8:26 am

Calendar quirk means that virus deaths are not included in the census

A calendar coincidence means that human loss to the coronavirus is not included in the 2020 census. This could save a New York Congress seat but cost Alabama one.

With the start of the U.S. pandemic and the reference date used for the census of April 1 last year being so close, the deaths that started in mid-March will not appear in the state’s population figures that reflect the political Representation in the USA determine Congress.

The timing will document losses from the virus, which killed around 44,000 people in New York state, including concentrations in some New York neighborhoods in Brooklyn, Queens and the Bronx. Alabama has reported around 8,000 virus-related deaths.

The number of US residents once a decade determines the number of congressional seats and electoral college votes each state receives. The division of congress seats is sometimes decided by relatively few people – as few as thousands or even hundreds of people.

Read the whole story here.

-The Associated Press

8:06 am

Find out about the last 24 hours

– Asia Fields

Seattle Times staff and news services