Live: Coronavirus daily news updates, March 23: What to know today about COVID-19 in the Seattle area, Washington state and the world

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Live: Coronavirus daily news updates, March 23: What to know today about COVID-19 in the Seattle area, Washington state and the world

In addition to mobile vaccination units, Yakima will also host the state’s first public mass vaccination center. The White House announced that it is expected to deliver 1,200 daily doses of the COVID-19 vaccine over a six-week period starting March 31. In addition to the mobile units, there will be a permanent drive-through vaccination facility in central Washington State Fair Park.

King County’s executive Dow Constantine announced plans to fight anti-Asian racism with funds from the American Rescue Plan, the pandemic relief law that granted Washington state billions of dollars, including $ 437 million for King County. The first part of the funding, Constantine said, will be $ 5 million for community organizations, including multicultural media and a coalition of eight organizations fighting hatred and bias.

We update this page with the latest news about the COVID-19 pandemic and its impact on the Seattle area, the US and the world.

Click here to see the past few days’ live updates and all of our coronavirus coverage, and here to see how we are following the daily spread in Washington and the world.

Britain reflects on “grief and loss” a year after the initial lockdown

A man wears a face mask as he passes the London Eye in London on Thursday 29 October 2020.  (AP Photo / Frank Augstein)

A man wears a face mask as he passes the London Eye in London on Thursday 29 October 2020. (AP Photo / Frank Augstein)

A year before the day Prime Minister Boris Johnson first put the country in lockdown to slow the fast-spreading coronavirus, charity Marie Curie organized a national end-of-life reflection day to celebrate the people remember who died after the contract COVID-19.

The UK has recorded more than 126,000 virus-related deaths, the highest number of pandemic deaths in Europe and one of the highest in the world as a percentage of population.

The country observed a minute’s silence at lunchtime to remember those who died after contracting the virus. Later, London’s skyline turns yellow when landmarks like the London Eye, Trafalgar Square and Wembley Stadium light up at dusk and people are asked to stand on their doorsteps at 8pm with phones, candles and flashlights to “ Beacon of Remembrance ”.

Read the story here.

– Pan Pylas, The Associated Press

8:01 a.m.

Putin’s COVID-19 vaccination should not go public

Russian President Vladimir Putin will receive his first vaccination against COVID-19 on Tuesday, but out of sight of the cameras, his spokesman said, raising questions about whether the gesture will increase comparatively low vaccination rates in Russia.

When asked whether the Kremlin will release photos or footage of Putin shooting down his coronavirus vaccine, Dmitry Peskov told reporters during a conference call that they “should take (our) word for it”.

Putin announced that he would be vaccinated at a government meeting on Monday. Kremlin critics have argued that Putin’s reluctance to get vaccinated contributed to the already growing domestic hesitation about the Sputnik-V vaccine.

Read the story here.

-The Associated Press

7:32 a.m.

According to Sinovac, the vaccine is safe for children from 3 years of age

Sinovac said his COVID-19 vaccine is safe in children ages 3 to 17, according to preliminary data, and has submitted the data to Chinese drug regulators.

China has approved its use in adults, but not yet in children, as the immune system may respond differently to the vaccine.

Early and medium clinical trials in over 550 adolescent subjects showed that the vaccine would trigger an immune response, Gang Zeng, Sinovac’s medical director, said at a news conference Monday. Two recipients developed a high fever in response to the vaccine, one a 3 year old and the other a 6 year old. The rest of the subjects had mild symptoms, Zeng said.

More than 70 million vaccinations have been given with Sinovac worldwide, including in China.

Read the story here.

-The Associated Press

6:37 a.m.

AP-NORC Survey: Learning setbacks are a primary concern of parents

FILE - In this file photo dated December 3, 2020, students wearing face masks work on computers at Tibbals Elementary School in Murphy, Texas.  A new survey by the University of Chicago's Harris School of Public Policy and the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs found that most parents fear their children may fall behind in school at home during the pandemic (AP Photo / LM Otero , File)

FILE – In this file photo dated December 3, 2020, students wearing face masks work on computers at Tibbals Elementary School in Murphy, Texas. A new survey by the University of Chicago’s Harris School of Public Policy and the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs found that most parents fear their children may fall behind in school at home during the pandemic (AP Photo / LM Otero , File)

Parents in the United States have come into conflict over schools reopening. Most are at least somewhat concerned that going back to the classroom will lead to more coronavirus cases, but there is an even deeper fear that their children will fall behind in school at home.

69 percent of parents are at least somewhat concerned that their children will experience setbacks at school due to the coronavirus pandemic, including 42 percent who say they are very or very concerned about Harris School, according to a new survey from the University of Chicago of Public Policy and the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research.

Read the story here.

-The Associated Press

6:33 a.m.

Oregon college students who are dissatisfied with online learning sue for their money back

Three students have filed class actions against Oregon’s two largest colleges. They stated that they were charged full for online courses of poorer quality than for one-to-one courses.

When the University of Oregon and Oregon State University closed their campuses because of the coronavirus pandemic, they didn’t offer to reimburse students for tuition, The Oregonian / OregonLive reported.

The University of Oregon says on its website that it cannot discount tuition fees to provide quality education now and in the future. The universities agreed to refund part of their room and board.

“We believe the University of Oregon wrongly continued to charge tuition for all the things they were not allowed to learn and use during the COVID-19 campus shutdown and that they switched to online courses,” said Steve Berman, managing partner of Hagens Berman and attorney for students in class action.

Read the story here.

-The Associated Press

6:00 am

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– Kris Higginson

Seattle Times staff and news services