Seattle on track for record dry April, but rain is in the forecast this week

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A view of a ferry approaching the Fauntleroy Ferry Terminal near Lincoln Park in West Seattle on April 19, 2020.

Callie Craighead,

April 20, 2020Updated: September 17, 2020, 5:02 p.m.

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A view of a ferry approaching the Fauntleroy Ferry Terminal near Lincoln Park in West Seattle on April 19, 2020.

Kristina Moy

People walking in Lincoln Park in West Seattle, Washington on April 19, 2020 on a sunny day.2of9

People walking in Lincoln Park in West Seattle, Washington on April 19, 2020 on a sunny day.

Kristina Moy

West Seattle's Lowman Beach Park has a rugged beach, tennis court, lawn, and swings.3of9

West Seattle’s Lowman Beach Park has a rugged beach, tennis court, lawn, and swings.

Kristina Moy

A sunny day in Lincoln Park in West Seattle, Washington on April 19, 2020.4thof9

A sunny day in Lincoln Park in West Seattle, Washington on April 19, 2020.

Kristina Moy

A closed gate and signs at the parking lot entrance of Lincoln Park in West Seattle, Washington.  The parking lot has been closed to increase social distancing and prevent gatherings in the parking lot under Governor Inslees state 5of9

A closed gate and signs at the parking lot entrance of Lincoln Park in West Seattle, Washington. The parking lot has been closed to increase social distancing and prevent gatherings in the parking lot as part of Governor Inslee’s statewide coronavirus order.

Aaron Moy |

A closed gate and signs at the entrance to Lincoln Park in West Seattle, Washington on March 25, 2020. The parking lot has been closed to increase social distancing and to prevent gatherings in the parking lot under Governor Inslees state 6of9

A closed gate and signs at the entrance to Lincoln Park in West Seattle, Washington on March 25, 2020. The parking lot has been closed to increase social distancing and prevent gatherings in the parking lot under Governor Inslees state’s “stay at home” coronavirus -Order.

Aaron Moy |

A social distancing sign posted at Alki Beach Park in Seattle, Washington on April 17, 2020.7thof9A social distancing sign posted at Alki Beach Park in Seattle, Washington on April 17, 2020.Kristina Moy

A King County Social Distancing Ambassador sitting on a park bench in Lincoln Park in West Seattle, Washington on April 19, 2020.8thof9

A King County Social Distancing Ambassador sitting on a park bench in Lincoln Park in West Seattle, Washington on April 19, 2020.

Kristina Moy

Social distancing signs posted in Lincoln Park in West Seattle, Washington on April 19, 2020.9of9

Social distancing signs posted in Lincoln Park in West Seattle, Washington on April 19, 2020.

Kristina Moy

The first 19 days of April are beneath our belts, and the weather has been near record breaking dry, with just meager rainfall of 0.060 inches by Monday.

This shockingly low number puts the city on track to break its previous April record of 33 inches of rain, which was measured back in 1956. However, there is a high chance that the end of the month will be accompanied by the seasonal April showers with cooler temperatures.

The near-record drought is expected to end in the middle of the week as a high pressure system moves out of the area. Increasing clouds can be expected through Tuesday with rain showers on Wednesday. Temperatures, which peaked at 70 degrees last week, are expected to remain in the upper 50s to mid 60s.

“An unexplained pattern will arrive on Wednesday and bring rain for the rest of the week,” wrote the National Weather Service.

Go, go … almost go away. The longest April dry run in Seattle in over 40 years is history. High pressure is leaving us and a number of weather systems will arrive by Wednesday next week. Perhaps the saying “April showers bring May flowers” still applies. #wawx pic.twitter.com/nzSGj4v9ZN

– NWS Seattle (@NWSSeattle) April 20, 2020

The showers are expected to return over the weekend.

The Emerald City has seen almost no rain compared to other subways on the west coast – San Diego has accumulated 3.90 inches of rain so far this month, and Los Angeles has seen 2.68 inches.

The summer months are drier and warmer than predicted under normal conditions.

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Callie is an editorial assistant for the SeattlePI.