We asked readers to write Valentine’s Day love letters to Seattle. Here are the best, sweetest and most interesting.

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We asked readers to write Valentine’s Day love letters to Seattle. Here are the best, sweetest and most interesting.

You know this feeling. It radiates from the heart when you look west at the Olympic Mountains from a high place in Seattle on a fine, clear day, perhaps sunset, and think, “Is this real life? I love this place. “

We feel it too.

For this reason, on Valentine’s Day, the Seattle Times asked readers to express themselves by writing love letters to our city, state, and region.

And, boy, did our clever readers deliver. We have haikus, catchy valentines, long tributes, and even a few nudges. All the usual suspects are present: mountains, water, lush greenery and, yes, the darkness and relentless winter rain. But there is also a lot of love for our communities and the people who make them great.

Here are the best, cutest, and most interesting love letters from Seattle Times readers.

Thank you Seattle for being so green, so mild, so enriching, and so inviting – the beauty of the Cascade Mountains invites us outside into the wonders of nature, while the city, in its theaters and arts, offers numerous opportunities for entertainment and relaxation offers / music programs. I’ve been here since 1969 and I’ve never looked back – Happy Valentine’s Day to the biggest home in the country! – – Jean Lanz

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Seattle, you’ve been my home for 22 years. Sure, we’ve had our ups and downs. There have been times when I’ve left you only to return quickly and with enthusiasm. And of course we’ve both changed over the years. You grew up in a large metropolis and brought more people with you to claim you as home, more cars on the street and more houses embedded in your finite space. It’s okay. I grew up too. Under your supervision, I climbed mountains and drove them down. I swam in the lake and over it – just because. I built a career here and started my logical family – the ones I’m not biologically related to but who are actually family. Because the thing is, Seattle, we’re getting each other. We may not always agree. We cannot agree and then reconcile. But I love you for what you are and what you become. Because while we are on the brink of great change, your future uncertain, and your tenacity being tested, you are still the only place I call home. – – Angela Curran

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A Valentine’s Day haiku: Seattle my home / We will survive this lost time / Come and accept hope. – – Rob Wallner

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I would start with how fascinating Seattle is. I live in Turkey but Seattle feels like home to me. Whenever his name is mentioned, on the news, in a movie, anywhere, my heart skips. The vibrant city, the beautiful, artistic and creative people in Seattle will always be my muse. Seattle is just very fascinating to me. There is something I cannot describe for my life. I hope that one day I can live there. Put on headphones and walk the streets and maybe even lose yourself. Literally and figuratively. – – Diana (no surname given)

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Dear Seattle, I love you because: You give me fresh air, green spaces and somehow calm, You give me excitement and hectic, You give me diversity so that I can appreciate all cultures, You give me a place called HOME. (Born at the UW – 54-year-old lifelong resident) – Monique Ryan

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Fidalgo Island Valentine: The rocks and trees are all there is on top of old Mount Erie. The lake shines silvery white, the sky looks gray and gloomy. It’s winter in Washington, we’re waiting and waiting for spring. The tulip fields will soon bloom; again our hearts will sing. – – Anonymous

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HARD LOVE: Mountain peaks flow into the sound, the beauty of the view, and I want more from you. Every day, sunny or gray, my smile doesn’t fade, but the dollars I need to stay make me run away! – – Dave (no surname given)

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This is the opening for something I wrote that sums up the reasons not to buy bottled water. I found my inspiration for this important but boring topic by thinking about what I love about Washington State: My home is in Washington State, the western half – the wet half. People elsewhere think that it rains here all the time. We natives smile smugly and say yes, it’s terrible. But honestly, summer in the Pacific Northwest is heaven on earth. We don’t run from the water; we run there and we don’t have to run far. In an hour or two from Seattle, you can dig clams by the ocean, catch fish on a lake, or cross crystal streams in the mountains. Please don’t tell anyone. – – Anita Wahler

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Living through The Big Dark for the past 16 years has been the perfect melting pot for this pandemic. This former Californian has learned to appreciate winter in Seattle – no, LOVE – with its atmospheric rivers that cascade down rain cavalcades for days, its menacing, blue-tinted twilight at noon, and the occasional bright burst of freshly scrubbed sunny days with deep blue skies. I spend my time in my house bubble and am in love with my daily lonely walks outside. My neighborhood is gorgeous with the iconic Seattle colors of February, the air is clean and smells of wet dirt and decaying leaves, and I’ve developed a taste for the construction workers building new townhouses next door and hammering, sawing and joking all over the day . It’s the little things I guess and all about your perspective. And another lesson that taught me moody, often bleak, but always amazingly in Seattle: I would not live anywhere else. – – Martina Loeffelmann

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Puget Sound, I loved your geography from the moment I first saw you as a college student visiting you for a long weekend. Your white capped mountains falling into glittering water. I love your weather, sometimes wet, sometimes stormy, but never extreme like other parts of the nation have. Seattle, I love your embrace of diversity and your attempts to be on the right side of history. I love walking your streets with a hot cup of coffee on a drizzly winter day. I love your chefs and your grossly underrated restaurants (New York and San Francisco get all the love, but I don’t have to pay attention to their neediness, you literally fill me up). I love your grit too. You are real. You don’t die, you fight to get to the next thing that is better for everyone and I love you for it. – – Frank Field

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Dear Seattle, you remember visiting the Frederick & Nelson tea room as a little girl from Sedro-Woolley in the 1950s. You know my steps on Capitol Hill when I went to St. Nicholas School in the ’60s and my teenage run around the UW campus that resulted in a 7:30 class on Monday morning in the early’ 70s. I loved you when we were together and even though we are now apart, I long for you to be my Valentine’s Day. True love lasts a lifetime. Please be mine – – Holly Reid

Alex Iniguez
on Twitter: @alexiniguez. Alex Iniguez is Assistant Metro Editor at the Seattle Times. After arriving in Seattle in the summer of 2018, he worked as an Assistant Sports Editor for over two years. He spent the past seven years with the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette and is a graduate of the University of Illinois.